Catching Waves

When creating a compelling piece, you’d need to first consider the outline, or if not, the concept at hand. There is a way to tell people how to examine their current data. Example: “I want to create a passage of interest for my members.” What is the first step toward this type of goal? A point of interest. The message will follow.


So, what do you need to tell a group what it might find to be most useful? Consider their needs. Consider their status. Draw them in to catch a wave.

So, what do you need to tell a group that it might find to be most useful? Consider their needs. Consider their status. Draw them in to catch a wave. One: if your group is a book club, like the MJ TS Book Club in Maryland, members will want to be informed about the upcoming book’s perspective. “Book ABC is a fantastical story about a young woman who travels the globe unannounced and without a trace.” You should place this information toward the beginning of the piece so readers can catch the wave into the remaining topic(s) to be presented. The need met? Introduction of your purpose.


Two: you can write to your member base and focus on the position of your readers. “Many opportunities exist for you to extend insight and offer up questions for our readership. Bring an open mind!" This is a call to action, and you are making a note of their status in the relationship. Provide this material several times throughout your written work in order to highlight its importance.

 

MJ Text Style recommends introducing the concept of catching a wave as a great way to make sure readers are “listening”. Readers look for keywords or phrases that highlight the main contents of the piece. They seek direction, and usually it's aboard your messaging vessel! Whether its attending the *next book club event, or improving your group's meetings, remember to ride the wave with your readers all the way to "finish".


MJ Text Style

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